posts - 34,  comments - 14,  trackbacks - 0
This article is quoted from forums of GameDev.net( In fact it is a thread )

The  question : 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Hello all, 

I am slightly unsure of which direction to take. I have a large array which will contain data pulled from a file. Like always, I proceeded to declare this array: 

  int array[1000]; 

Then I remembered some code that I saw in a tutorial: 

  int *array; 
  array = new int[1000]; 


I read up on it and it seems that dynamic memory goes on the heap, while static memory goes on the stack. I also learned that the heap is much larger than the stack. So my question is, which of the above methods is the best? And please correct me if I'm wrong on my new found knowledge. Thank you. 


The  answer: ( selected ) 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Many people like to think there are 2 types of memory, stack and heap ... because that's all most people have to think about most the time, there are really more than that. 

There is data segment data (as mentioned by fpsgamer) and memory mapped i/o addresses (for instance when you write to video buffers or files, it is not using normal ram, it is just that certain addresses are mapped by the os to write to certain destinations). 

between the 3 you can control: 

// without initialization 
int dataSegment[1000]; 
int main() 

  int stack[1000]; 
  int *heap; 
  heap = new int[1000]; 

// with initialization 
int dataSegmentB[4] = {56, 23, 11, 945}; 
int mainB() 

  int stackB[4] = {56, 23, 11, 945}; 
  int *heapB; 
  heap = new int[4]; 
  heapB[0] = 56; 
  heapB[1] = 23; 
  heapB[2] = 11; 
  heapB[3] = 945; 
} 

The dataSegment normallys grows the size of your executable to hold it. This data will then be loaded in main memory when the program loads, along with the rest of the application. 

The stack values are pushed onto the stack when the function is called and poped off when it returns. if a function is in the call stack more than once (ie recursion) than there is memory in the stack for each instance, and that memory may of course have different values. 

paramters to function are passed on the stack. In fact the purpose of the stack is to hold the return address of the function, its parameters, and its local variables. 

there is a stack PER THREAD. 

The heap values are allocated by the language or operating system from a dynamic pool of memory. The heap is shared by all threads in a process (in most normal OSes) so it can be slower to use heap memory in multithread capable apps because they must use locks to protect allocations and returns that use the heap. Many advanced systems have been built to have block allocating heaps, or thread specific heaps to eliminate various costs when it is important. 

In general the cost of accessing any memory once allocated is not at all based on stack / data segment / heap ... but instead is based on whether or not the memory is currently in the CPU cache, if not, it causes a cache miss. This is based almost exclusively on how recently the memory was accessed, so hitting the same area in the heap 500 times in a row is no different than hitting the stack 500 times in a row. But hitting 40 variables right next to each other in the stack is less likely to use many data pages of cache than hitting 40 variables allocated on the heap ... especially if those variables we're allocated at different times in the application, and vary in size, etc. 

The stack is often very limited in size (like 8kb on many platforms), so it is a VERY bad choice to use the stack for large data. Although the normal reason you choose between heap and stack is not size, but object lifetime. If the variable needs to exist only for the life of the function - and is known at compile time, it should be put on the stack (unless it is very large). If it needs to exist for longer than the life of the function it cannot be put on the stack, so only heap and data segment are possible. data segment values are, by definition, alive for the entire application and are effectively permanent globals / statics. 
posted on 2007-10-19 12:07 Konami wiki 阅读(219) 评论(0)  编辑 收藏 引用
只有注册用户登录后才能发表评论。